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Foodie Friday – Kimchi & Zucchini Pad Thai

Screen Shot 2016-02-05 at 10.43.25 AMThe sweet and sour tamarind sauce balances perfectly with spicy kimchi and smoked tofu. If you don’t have a spiralizer, run a peeler along length of zucchini to make large ribbons and slice into strands with a knife to resemble noodles. Alternatively, try using a julienne peeler available at kitchen stores.

Prep time: 20 minutes
Cook time: N/A
Yields: 4 servings

Tamarind Sauce:
3 tbsp (45ml) almond butter
2 tbsp (30ml) tamarind paste
2 tbsp (30ml) maple syrup
2 tbsp (30ml) apple cider vinegar
1 tbsp (15ml) fish sauce
2 large zucchini, spiralized (about 4 cups, 1L)
1-1/2 (375ml) cups kimchi, chopped
1 cup (250ml) diced smoked tofu
1/4 cup (60ml) cilantro leaves
1/4 cup (60ml) bean sprouts
2 tbsp (30ml) crushed peanuts
2 lime wedges

Directions:
In a bowl, whisk together almond butter, tamarind paste, maple syrup, apple cider vinegar, and fish sauce. Toss with zucchini, kimchi and tofu. Divide between two plates and garnish with cilantro, bean sprouts, peanuts and lime wedges. Serve immediately.

Nutritional analysis per serving:
Calories: 206 kcal
Protein: 9 grams 
Fat: 10 grams
Carbohydrate: 21.5 grams
Fibre: 5 grams
Sodium : 764.5 mg

A Vegetarian Diet in Winter

Being vegetarian or vegan in winter might seem like a sad prospect for anyone unfamiliar with the plethora of delicious and versatile foods that can be harvested December through February. These months of the year offer much more than soggy, overboiled cabbage; it’s easier than you may think to keep your intake of fruits and vegetables high and healthy.

It’s been over a decade that I have been a vegan and I can say with confidence that I truly appreciate the benefits of eating seasonally. For those wondering how to maintain a healthy and varied vegetarian diet in Winter, here are a few tips:

Get to Know Your Winter Crops
Find out if there’s a winter farmers market near you and prepare to be amazed at the bounty, even in these chilly months. You might even want to consider planning a winter food garden, complete with beets and carrots that can be stored in the ground until you need them! Or, set up an indoor garden in front of a large window with lots of light, and sow fast-growing crops like radishes, chives, lettuce and spinach, along with parsley and cilantro.

In the Pacific Northwest between December and February, there are delicious local apples and pears to be harvested, along with cabbage, turnips, winter squash, and the last of the season’s Brussels sprouts. Fresh rosemary and sage are also great at this time of year, and garlic tastes even better after the first frost.

Winter crops are packed with fiber, vitamins, minerals and have phytonutrients.

Get Creative With Your Fruits and Veggies
If you think winter veggies consist of eating the same old potatoes and beets, think again. There are plenty of ways to add flavour and variety to your vegetarian winter diet – you just have to get a little creative in the kitchen! For example:

Mashed Potatoes: Try adding a few mashed turnips and some minced garlic to this winter staple to lower the glycemic index and bump up the nutrient value.

Cabbage: Make a rice vinegar and sesame oil coleslaw using shredded cabbage, carrots and minced garlic to keep your intake of fibre, enzymes and antioxidants high.

Squash: Try roasting slices of winter squash with a dash of cinnamon and a sprinkling of coconut sugar for a decadent side dish that’s perfect for warming up after snowshoeing or cross-country skiing.

Brussels Sprouts: Whip up these tasty leafy green buds by flash-frying them with Brazil nuts and olive oil – yum!

Apples: Consider stocking your freezer with diced apples, perfect for baking a quick and easy crumble!

Pears: Try poaching fresh pears in antioxidant black tea, then drizzle them with a dark chocolate, black tea sauce.

Get Your Vitamin D
The shorter days and the low-lying sun mean it is harder for Canadians to synthesise sufficient vitamin D from the sun between October and April. Make sure you’re including healthy fortified foods in your diet or taking a vitamin D supplement during these winter months. The same goes for non-vegetarians at this latitude!

 

source: Natural Factors

Foodie Friday: Southwestern Salad in a Jar

Foodie Friday

If you find yourself running out the door in the morning without grabbing anything for lunch, today’s recipe is perfect for you. Not only is it healthy and filling, but you can prep multiple portions at once and it can be customized to your liking. Here’s one of many possible salad in a jar recipes for you to try! We like using BNTO lunch box adapters to separate our salad and dressing. This means our salad won’t get soggy!

Southwestern Salad in a Jar

This recipe was adapted from this MJ AND HUNGRYMAN recipe.

Ingredients

A jar with the BNTO lunchbox adapter is perfect for this salad in a jar Photo courtesy of www.cuppow.com

A jar with the BNTO lunchbox adapter is perfect for this salad in a jar. More colours are available at The Granary!
Photo courtesy of www.cuppow.com

Salad

  • 1/2 cup canned black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 4 or 5 cherry tomatoes, sliced in half
  • 1/2 diced bell pepper (colour of your choice)
  • 1/2 avocado, diced
  • 1/2 cup of corn, fresh or canned
  • grated cheese of your choice (optional)
  • crushed tortilla chips (optional)
  • grilled chicken or protein of your choice (optional)
  • 2 cups mixed greens

Chipotle Lime Salad Dressing 

  • juice of 1 lime
  • 4 tablespoons of olive oil
  • 1 clove minced garlic
  • a dash of chipotle hot sauce (to taste, we like it spicy so we added a couple dashes)
  • roughly chopped fresh cilantro
  • salt and pepper to taste (optional)

Instructions

Begin by layering your ingredients into your jar. First, add the beans, followed by your tomatoes, peppers, avocado and corn. Top that off with cheese, tortilla chips and chicken if you’re adding it. Finally fill the remaining space (leaving room for your BNTO lunchbox adapter) with mixed greens. Set this aside and whisk together your salad dressing ingredients. Pour that into your BNTO lunchbox adapter and seal with the lid. Store in your fridge and grab and go whenever you need to!